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A high quality network,built with frustration.

AS393577 is a network created by us, whose purpose is to provide high quality routing to hobbyists, developers, and anyone else. Our network's quality is consistently rated as one of the best in our category of hosting providers.

Contact

Our contact information is located on our website, at https://tritan.gg/contact. We prefer contact via our NOC email, but you can also reach us using a variety of methods.

Peering Policy

We are open to peering with anyone, anywhere. A list of physical IXPs we are present at can be found on our PeeringDB.

You will need to:

  • Have an ASN and publicly routable IP space of at least a /24 IPv4 and/or /48 IPv6.
  • Have an entry on PeeringDB and keep it up to date.
  • All routes must be filtered to only send routes that have valid RPKI records.
  • Only send routes that you are allowed to send or from your own network.
  • Only send traffic that is destined to routes that we announced to you.
  • You add our ASN to your AS-SET, and accept any routes from our upstream AS-SET.
  • You do not announce bogons.
  • Not point default or static routes at us without permission. You must only send us traffic for prefixes we advertise.

If you're interested, please contact our NOC.

Routing Policy

Listed below is our network's routing policy for all accepted routes, customers, and downstreams.

Attempt to find an as-set to use for this network:

  1. In PeeringDB, for this ASN, check for an IRR as-set name. Validate the as-set name by retrieving it. If it exists, use it.
  2. In IRR, query for an aut-num for this ASN. If it exists, inspect the aut-num for this ASN to see if we can extract from their IRR policy an as-set for what they will announce to Tritan by finding export or mp-export to AS393577, ANY, or AS-ANY. Precedence is as follows: The first match is used, "export" is checked before "mp-export", and "export: to AS393577" is checked before "export: to ANY" or "export: to AS-ANY". Validate the as-set name by retrieving it. If it exists, use it.
  3. Check various internal lists maintained by Tritan Internet's NOC that map ASNs to as-set names where we discovered or were told of them. Validate the as-set name by retrieving it. If it exists, use it.
  4. If no as-set name is found by the previous steps use the ASN.
  5. Collect the received routes for all BGP sessions with this ASN. This details both accepted and filtered routes.

For each route, perform the following rejection tests:

  • Reject default routes 0.0.0.0/0 and ::/0.
  • Reject AS paths that use BGP AS_SET notation (i.e. [1] or [1 2], etc).
  • Reject prefix lengths less than minimum and greater than maximum. For IPv4 this is 8 and 24. For IPv6 this is 16 and 48. 3.4 Reject bogons (RFC1918, documentation prefix, etc).
  • Reject exchange prefixes for all exchanges Tritan Internet is connected to.
  • Reject AS paths that use unallocated ASNs between 64496 to 131071 and 1000000 to 4294967295. https://www.iana.org/assignments/as-numbers/as-numbers.xhtml
  • Reject AS paths that use AS23456. AS23456 should not be encountered in the AS paths of BGP speakers that support 32-bit ASNs.
  • Reject AS paths that use AS0. As per RFC 7606, "A BGP speaker MUST NOT originate or propagate a route with an AS number of zero".
  • Reject routes that have RPKI status INVALID_ASN or INVALID_LENGTH based on the origin AS and prefix.
  • Reject AS paths that use known transit networks.

Communities

The following are our origin communities to express where routes are learned from:

  • 393577:0:12, Route originated from transit provider.
  • 393577:0:13, Route originated from an internet exchange.
  • 393577:0:14, Route originated from direct peer.
  • 393577:0:15, Route originated from downstream.
  • 393577:0:16, Route originated from our internal routers.

"Good for the internet"

Connectivity

Our network is built on a foundation of frustration. We were tired of the lack of quality and high prices of other providers, so we decided to build our own. Our network is built on a foundation of frustration. We were tired of the lack of quality and high prices of other providers, so we decided to build our own.
Network connectivity

Network Topology

Our network is built on a foundation of frustration. We were tired of the lack of quality and high prices of other providers, so we decided to build our own. We have multiple points of redundancy built in, while also having a strong centralized core. We have multiple transit providers, including Arelion, Hurricane Electric, Cogent, and GSL. We also have multiple peering partners, including Google, Cloudflare, and Facebook.
Network connectivity

Downstreams

Tritan Internet is proud to power the following networks:

NameASNPeeringDB